Lulucf Paris Agreement

The LULUCF Regulation implemented the agreement reached in October 2014 between EU Heads of State and Government that all sectors should contribute to the EU`s 2030 emissions reduction target, including the land use sector. At the simplest stage, governments can opt for “gross” or “net” accounting. Gross emissions include emissions from sectors other than LULUCF. In comparison, net emissions include gross emissions less by the reduction [2] or increased by emissions from LULUCF activities. The comparison between two countries, one with a raw approach, the other with a net approach, would therefore be similar to the comparison of apples and pears. The EU is currently discussing the post-2020 LULUCF accounting rules and will close them before accounting guidelines are put in place at international level for countries` national contributions (NDCs), including forests and land. This agreement will set a precedent for the UNFCCC negotiations, which will not be easy to find, given that there are countries that try to “hide” emissions from their land sector by supporting accounting tricks that do not constitute the total impact of land use activities on the climate. If LULUCF emissions are a reduction, which is often the case, that country`s emissions would appear lower than those of a country using a gross approach, because the de facto reduction reduces the resulting net emissions and vice versa: if LULUF emissions are added to gross emissions, emissions appear to be larger than the country excluding LULUCF. In the Environment and/or Agriculture Council, Member States will debate the ESC proposal under the leadership of their successive Presidencies: 2016: Netherlands, Slovakia, 2017: Malta, Estonia (no UK Presidency!), 2018: Bulgaria, Austria. The high uncertainty of the data – and the possible fluctuations – in LULUCF emissions has really put these emissions in a different category. Combining the two in an aggregate objective would also impose these uncertainties on other sectors. In the event of unexpected developments in the LULUCF sector, emissions may be significantly higher or lower in other sectors.

Assessing uncertainties in the LUUCF sector gives governments the freedom to calculate, which will affect the achievement of other sectors` emissions targets. This breakthrough takes into account the many criticisms previously made that emissions from biomass have not been taken into account in energy production under EU legislation. . . .